"Raspberry Ripples" (树莓涟漪)
// BLURB //
Look mom, no hands! In the age-old art of Chinese dance, a bit of arm waving goes a long way. The use of extended sleeves in traditional performances can be traced back even further. Arm extensions and shawls first appeared in shows as early as the Zhou dynasty (1046-256 BCE) and Tang tradition also favored the flamboyant throws. These quite literally in-your-face and mesmerizing aids were originally made of cloth but became silk in later years, suggesting their increased value to audiences. Expressing elegance and communicating moods, they did so by accentuating hand gestures as they got swung around to the music in performances. Long sleeve attachments aren’t only a thing of the past however; they still have strong ties in today’s Asian performing arts scene. The eye-catching glad rags continue to make waves at important ceremonies, shows and events as their heritage lives on. The result is some of the finest visual free flow you’ll see and it’s always happy hour entertainment during the show. Because China’s association with the long sleeve in dance is so much more than just a fling.
STATUS
Available. Please CONTACT US for inquiries.
EDITION, MEDIA, SIZE & WEIGHT
1/8 Edition, Shanghai 2020
RGB LED display, sand & resin coating, rosewood frame
124.6(W)×124.6(H)×7.2(D) cm // 49 kg
TECH SPECS
• 1×SLC micro SD Card
• 7×MWLPV-60-5 (INPUT 100~240VAC@1.2A / OUTPUT 5V@8A)
• 1×MWLPV20-5 (INPUT 100~240VAC@0.55A / OUTPUT 5V@3A)
• (26+1 spare)×RGB P4-1921-64X32-8S-S1 / SWP4190826XMJF-0238/7112
CRATE SIZE & WEIGHT
138(W)×138(H)×24(D) cm // 99.1 kg
EXPOSURE
Perimeters, Edges, and Walls” at island6 Shanghai Main Space
CREDITS
Zhang Tian Yi 张天伦 (performance) • Yeung Sin Ching 杨倩菁 (production supervisor) • Thomas Charvériat (art direction & animation) • Ryan Watson (blurb)
CLOSE-UPS
VIDEO

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